solitude

What’s a hermit doing on Facebook?

Morandi craggy islander

The news of Italian retired teacher, Mauro Morandi, 81, being evicted from the Isle of Budelli, off the coast of Sardinia, where he has lived as its sole inhabitant for the last 32 years, comes in a week when I have been thinking of the isolated experiences of Tom Neale on Suwarrow, in the Cook’s, in the late 50s. Neale wrote of a gap of fourteen months between seeing, and speaking to, one human being and the next. Of course, in the late 50s, the internet was a long way off but he also had no radio.

How necessary is a remote and uninhabited island for one’s sense of solitude? Is that kind of liberty more within the mind than the environment?

Imagine living in a busy city – maybe you’re in one in reality – just switching off the world wide web would increase your sense of isolation a hundredfold.

But I guess the extreme isolation helps but there’s a dangerous fine line between enjoying solitude and experiencing loneliness.

Morandi posted of his threatened eviction on his Facebook page. He had many followers, it says. He didn’t relish a relocation up north (Italy?) playing cards or bowls. Playing the odd game of cards or bowls seems a quaint and quiet pastime compared to Facebook.

It explains he initially set sail from Italy to Polynesia some three decades or more ago; and didn’t get much beyond Sardinia – which to my schoolboy’s knowledge of Mediterranean geography is a bit like sailing from Portsmouth for Australia and settling on the Isle of Wight.

This tells me you don’t have to go too far – or as far as you might think – to find contentment.

Let’s wish him good fortune in his new life wherever he finds it.

Italian hermit – CNN

The Luddite and The Intellectual Hermit

A Luddite and an intellectual hermit walk into a pub.

“What will you have, gents?” asks the barman.

“Possibly an aversion to the deceptions of progress,” the Luddite replies.

“Sorry, sir,” says the barman, “we don’t do those fancy cocktails.”

The Luddite

Sorry, that’s a bad twist on an old joke. Two things recently had me thinking about the way of the world today. First was an announcement that the team I work for is invited to experience the developments of another team involved in producing virtual reality solutions. In case we are in any doubt as to what this involves, the email included a couple of images, one showing a scene which could be a screen capture from a very dull video game, and the other some bloke, looking blindly towards the ceiling, wearing a set of Oculus type goggles.

Unusual for me, I can’t raise much curiosity or enthusiasm for the prospect. In my imagination I can predict the illusion of experiencing being on the inside a very bad video game, the trick being the screen’s eye view adjusts according to feedback from the relative position of the goggles. As with a magician’s trick, when you work out how it can be done, it loses all potency to be awesome.

Or, to put it another way, reality does the trick way better: the scene around us is brilliantly rendered, and it all moves about precisely as we move our senses relatively to it. The only thing is we take it all for granted and there’s no smack about the chops moment, no “awesome!”

Though really I feel my slight aversion to this stems from a building annoyance that “expert” people in my field are surrendering their imagination to the machines, and we are obliged to follow suit. I’ve met those now who can’t visualise from concepts and basic drawings – they need to see the 3D model. Visualisation was once an essential skill in the job. In a generation, it will be obsolete.

The Intellectual Hermit

I saw another inspiring article in the news yesterday. It was about hermits. Real life, modern day hermits. Haven’t you ever once in your life contemplated a life as a hermit?

The story focuses on two quite different hermits. The first is Christopher Knight who, in 1986, aged 20, took himself off to a wood in Maine, USA, never to be seen again for 27 years (actually, he did meet a lost hiker once and exchanged a simple “hi”). He lived in a tent, stole what little he needed to survive and thus he was caught in a trap by the police investigating these thefts. He said his decision to hide away was a desire to be alone, free of the world. There was no incident, traumatic, shameful or otherwise, in his previous life which caused this; it was just in his nature.

The second hermit is the Christian, Sara Maitland, who lives alone in a self-built house on a moor in Scotland. The reason she gives for her chosen lifestyle is ecstasy. Solitude is “total joy”, she explains. You know, I can relate to that.

Even so, I don’t think I could handle it for a prolonged length of time, never mind a whole lifetime. It’s not the risk that solitude can easily tip over into loneliness; you could just pack it in and move back. It’s the physical hardship which appears to come with it – working for survival. Unless, like Knight, you steal.

An idea then came to me about intellectual hermits. In his poem, To Althea, from Prison, Richard Lovelace, incarcerated in Gatehouse prison for political dissent in 1642, around the time of our English Civil Wars, writes the final verse,

Stone walls do not a prison make,
Nor iron bars a cage:
Minds innocent and quiet take
That for an hermitage.
If I have freedom in my love,
And in my soul am free,
Angels alone, that soar above,
Enjoy such liberty.

I can’t think of anymore to add to this notion of freedom, in love, soul and mind, except let us contemplate that thought for a while.


On Hermits – why this man became a hermit at 20 (BBC News stories)

To Althea, From Prison (Richard Lovelace, 1642) – (wiki)

images: “Occulus” wearing guy (top) and Sara Maitland, in Scotland (below)