motive

The Upright Creator

Sue Vincent’s comment on The Name of the Cloud That Ate The Sun has me thinking about a creator and its motives.

The idea of God, the creator, of the Abrahamic faiths has Him creating us in his image. This is understandable as we readily create imaginary beings in our own image, or partly so. Intelligent alien life is usually bipedal, with limbs and a head on top with eyes and ears and a multi-functioning mouth – and many of them speak fluent English in an American accent. The popular idea of a robot is also a bipedal machine.

Given that bipeds came last in line, whether it’s creationism or evolution, what gives with all the other stuff which came before? Well, robots might be the clue. Getting the things to stand upright and walk. It’s not easy and with a lot of robotics, this is an unnecessary fancy but it doesn’t stop a lot of technicians struggling with the concept. They will succeed but more because of god than being good designers, I think.

But why would a creator be bipedal, being, as it were, out there in space and existent throughout all time? Why would it need to stand up when there is no up in which to stand?


image from Michelangelo’s The Creation of Adam

Advertisements

Flash Fiction: Same Same but different (Synonyms)

“What are your plans for today, Tom?”

“Today!, I shall attempt a life study; I shall render you, in your full glory, in oils! Now, if you would kindly divest yourself of your garments and stand over by the window… the dappled illumination of the morning sun through the drapes will look gorgeous on your skin.”

“In your dreams.”

“Oh, come on, Claire, cast away your inhibitions, free the inner wild child, be the adventuress!”

“Yeah, right. What is it with you and getting naked all of a sudden? It never seemed to excite you before. You’ve become a bit lascivious in your old age.”

“Lascivious?! I assure you, madam, I am nothing of the kind. I am a champion! of the aesthetic figurative womanly form; I am all for life’s rich beauty! I am an enthusiast!”

“You’re a dirty scoundrel… here, have a go at these pretty geraniums in this nice pot. I’m off to the shops for a bit and I’m meeting Jill for coffee. You be good…Bye!”

“Oh, Claire! But…. Oh, damn and bollocks!”

(178 words)


This is my piece for Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie same same but different writing prompt.

The idea is not to use the five words listed here, but to find synonyms for each and weave those synonyms into a story.

I have to say, this is right up my strasse, if you’ll forgive the vernacular. I remember getting my first thesaurus from a mail order book club I once belonged to. It was a mistake, I’d forgetten to post the notice to decline the offer and it was then sent by default. Roget’s Thesaurus! I’d never even heard of a thesaurus before. If asked, I would have guessed at some sort of dinosaur. It took a while to work out how to use it but it did prove useful.

Right, I don’t go in for much dialogue in my writing. No reason, I’ve nothing against dialogue, I just don’t do it much. I think it’s something to do with the he said, she said business and whether you need to find a different word for said each time. But then I’ve seen a lot of advice which says avoid this approach, it looks messy. Simply stick to he said, she said. So I avoided “said” altogether here, it’s not always necessary as I hope you can see.